People on the Move – A Human Crisis: Refugees, Asylum Seekers, and the Internally Displaced.

Christopher Cart,  “I Fear What You Fear”,  oil on canvas, 24” x 30”, 2018
Christopher Cart, “I Fear What You Fear”, oil on canvas, 24” x 30”, 2018

above: Christopher Cart, “I Fear What You Fear”, oil on canvas, 24” x 30”, 2018  

Throughout the month of February Camden Public Library and the Jonathan Frost Gallery presented a large joint art show titled People on the Move – A Human Crisis:  Refugees, Asylum Seekers, and the Internally Displaced.

The artwork varied widely.  It included portraits, scenes of fleeing refugees, scenes of repression and brutality, symbolic evocations of displacement, detainment, and death, and symbolic evocations of the ideals of ethnic and political harmony.

Susan Beebe, “Portrait of Safi”, oil on canvas, 20” x 24”, 2018

The show was organized by Kit Harrison, Jonathan Frost, and Susan Beebe in concert with Cayla Miller, of the Camden Library. The purpose was to bring attention in our local community to the fact that across the world over 65 million people are on the move, driven from their homes by political repression, war, famine, and environmental devastation.

“I was thinking, what can I do, as an artist? I had this nebulous idea that maybe we could do a show on refugees,” said Beebe. Then, running into Kit Harrison at Rock City Café one day last summer, she discovered that she and Kit shared the same dismay and vision.

Twenty-four artists eventually responded to their Call to Artists, and showed, in their work, what moved them about this human crisis.

Titi de Baccarat, “Black White Yellow”, mixed media, 21” x 32”, 2017

Three of the artists included in the show are themselves newcomers to Maine. One, Titi de Baccarat, is from Gabon and has been working and making quite a name for himself as an artist since arriving here in Maine two years ago. He spoke eloquently at the Artists’ Talk about the importance of local Mainers opening their hearts to newcomers – the importance of trying to feel the loneliness of what it is like to be a displaced person, living here out of necessity.

Orson Horchler, “Mainer Project 10”, charcoal, pen, 16” x 16”, 2016

Orson Horchler, another newcomer, who goes by his artist name Pigeon, described the challenges of trying to find community in a new land. Here for a number of years, he works long hours running a contracting business, while also pursuing his artwork. In addition, he travels the state, visiting in schools and other community centers to share his message of tolerance.

Veronica Kaluta, “Self-Portrait” collage, 11” x 14”, 2018

Veronica, the third immigrant artist in the show, is a very articulate fourteen year-old, who is a refugee from the DR Congo. One year ago she spoke no English. During the run of People on the Move she delivered two moving talks in English about her life as a refugee – a young, living reminder for those in attendance of human resilience.

There were three special events associated with the show: an opening reception at the Jonathan Frost Gallery where individual artists spoke briefly about their work; an Artists’ Talk at the Camden Public Library where Titi De Baccarat, Orson Horchler, Veronica Kaluta, and Wendy Newbold Patterson spoke about their work and experiences; a reception at the Camden Public Library timed to coincide with the Camden Conference. All the events were very well attended.

Asked to reflect on the show, Harrison said, I’m really just hoping that people will look at others with new eyes.”

Jonathan Frost, “Portrait of Jordan”, oil on canvas , 20” x 24”, 2018

“It gives you encouragement to feel something about this and express it,” Beebe said. “I hope we start a conversation, and people will look and think and talk and act.”

James Murdock, “Open the Gate–Draco’s Gate”, mixed media, 32” x 40”, 2005

Participating artists were Lois Anne, Susan Beebe, Christopher Cart, Gregory Chilenski, Clarity, Titi De Beccarat, Alan Fishman, Jonathan Frost, Nancy Glassman, Lucy Goulet, Nan Haid, Orson Horchler, Mwandja Kaluta, Salima Kalute, Veronica Kaluta, Renate Klein, Jeannette Martin, Cynthia McGuirl, James Murdock, Wendy Newbold Patterson, Emeline Russell, Marjorie Strauss, and Hannah Wells.

Artists’ quotes courtesy of Courier Publications