Near—Here

by Mary Armstrong

Tsunami Wave, Oil and Wax on Panel, 24″X72″ 2015-17

—These images of my paintings represent a chronological order and represent the work that I feel is most directly influenced by my time here in Maine. There are other groups of works that deal with other issues and themes—Mary Armstrong, 2017

 

Summer Song, Oil on Panel, 30″X23″ 1986

I first came to Maine to go to Skowhegan (then a school of Painting and Sculpture) in the summer of 1977. I returned as co-dean (with my husband-to-be Stoney Conley) in 1980 and then as faculty wife (Stoney taught fresco) in 1984-85. How lucky for us. The cosmopolitan nature of Skowhegan set us up, from the beginning, in a community of Maine artists and an International array of visitors that gave us a sense of Maine as a contemporary haven for all kinds of work.

 

We fell in love with each other and Maine at the same time. We were able to buy a little house on the coast at Georgetown in 1980.

Solitary Tree, Oil on Panel,24″X30″ 1984

 

For our first few decades we spent summer’s teaching-free months painting in makeshift studios. We lived a very solitary life of work. The only socializing was the occasional visit to Skowhegan for visiting artist’s lectures. Gradually we got to know some of the locals here in Georgetown. But, coming to Maine still means removing from the world, to focus, to work.

 

 

Besieged, Oil on Panel, 34″X30″ Oil on Panel, 1987

I think that there are several “Art Scenes” in Maine. We are so lucky to have the great regional museums and art centers, scattered throughout the state, that showcase really good work from artists working in Maine. I think these institutions keep us all on our toes, inspired and challenged.The Center for Maine Contemporary Art (CMCA) is especially important for expanding coverage and scouring the state for ambitious talent.

 

For me, the most interesting statement and question that you pose is: “ Today’s art culture inhabits an international archipelago populated by the educated, well- traveled, and well- read. These like-minded individuals may have more in common with their counterpart’s half way around the globe than with their next-door neighbor. Can a regional style be authentic in this atmosphere, or is it bound to be a willfully naïve affectation?

Dante’s Woods, Oil on Panel, 26″X22″, 1996

 

I think It’s important to keep an open mind and a raging curiosity about what other artists are doing.  Now, at this later stage, it is just as important for me to make work that closes the distance between where I am, what I think and feel about that, and how paint, as an embodying material, can explore that.

 

Near Here, Oil and wax on Panel, 22X24″, 2010

There is an important balance between the world and the work. But, ultimately, the deeper wells of inspiration come more and more from simply being….in the light of Maine and my imagination. Perhaps I am willfully naive. If that can be translated into moving with rigorous simplicity, I’ll take it!

Bruised Sky, Oil and Wax on Panel, 22″X24″ 2018

Estuarial, Oil and Wax on Panel, 32″X36″, 2016

 

Lift Off, Oil and Wax on Panel, 36″X42″ 2016


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