John Bisbee – State of the Studio

“American Steel”; 4”, 6”, 8”, and 12” Bright Common Spikes, Weld; dimensions variable, 2018.

For the last year and a half, I have been obsessed with creating my upcoming show, American Steel, at CMCA. It is a true departure for me on many fronts: it’s realist, it’s text-driven, it’s political, and hopefully it’s funny. If it’s not a little bit funny something’s gone wrong, and if it doesn’t go past this charged political moment, something has also gone wrong.

I’m attempting to unpack my abstract and specific thoughts about this country of ours.

The work runs from the miniature–oyster shells–to the macro–enormous pillars and a serpent. I’m hoping the work will read like a dark allegorical fairytale with some optimistic twists. It  has been an amazing work cycle. So many new discoveries of technique and form and specificity. When I’m not terrified I’m having the best time of my life.

The obvious reason for this strange new batch of work is the injection of toxins that this current administration has shot into our politics, and even more significantly, into our society. Trump has opened the door that I had hoped would remain locked at the bottom of the ocean. People just feel comfortable spitting hate without ever hearing or even wanting a cogent response. Because the dialogue seems so discordant, I felt compelled to enter it.

John Bisbee studio shot #1, photo courtesy of J. Myer
John Bisbee studio shot #2, photo courtesy of J. Myer
John Bisbee studio shot #3, photo courtesy of J. Myer

The Wave of Creativity by Dietlind Vander Schaaf

by Dietlind Vander Schaaf

 

Last winter I found myself in a bit of an artistic slump. The flow of energy and ideas that had moved through me freely and guided my work for years seemed to have dried up. As winter gave way to spring, I reached beyond my studio walls to other artists in my orbit curious about what they were working on. How had they ridden the wave of creativity over the long haul? What did their daily studio practices look like? I wanted their insights. Ultimately their answers cast my experiences as part of a larger and ongoing conversation. As painter Gail Spaien notes, “painting is a physical manifestation of life…it brings us in closer contact with what it means to be alive and heightens our awareness about that which is not visible.”

 

Henry Wolyniec

Henry Wolyniec is involved with three distinct bodies of work at the moment. The first, which he has been working on for the last decade, consists of paper collage and relief printing. The second is a series of painted wire and paper sculptures started in the summer of 2017. The third is photography, which he has been doing for about three years. Henry says of his work that it is not concept driven or grounded in ideas; rather he continues at a piece until a series of visual decisions seem to come together.

Henry Wolyniec, HW 17.29, relief print and paper collage, 24” x 19”, 2017

Photography started as a fast and easy way for Wolyniec to capture an image. After a while, he noticed that certain kinds of images, specifically densely-packed compositions that included some form of overlapping shadow or reflection, kept showing up. Around the same time, he saw that his collages, in comparison, had gone flat and lacked composition. Recognizing he had worked himself into an aesthetic corner, Wolyniec realized photography would help him find his way out.

Henry Wolyniec, HW 16.3, relief print and paper collage, 17” x 16”, 2016

For Henry, navigating his need to have the time, energy, and focus his work requires has meant letting go of certain personal relationships not in sync with art making, as well as making specific choices around work and living situations that are affordable and studio friendly. Keeping life simple and uncluttered works, he notes, if money is not a motivation or within realistic reach.

 

Ingrid Ellison

Currently at work on a series that explores different color combinations, Ingrid Ellison’s paintings are an effort to balance pressure with open space. Her ideas come in the form of visual cues from nearly everywhere–the foggy harbor, a solitary mountain path, cracked and peeling paint, the shadow on a wall, a new tube of paint, passages from books and phrases from poems or songs, as well as time spent alone, out of doors, moving through space, woods, or water. There her mind empties and her thoughts are clearest.

Ingrid Ellison, Last April in Saint George, oil on panel, 12” x 12”, 2018
Ingrid Ellison, this is everything I know about Winter, 36” x 36”, oil on linen, 2018

Lately she has begun to explore writing as an extension of her creative practice. She keeps a visual journal that she takes everywhere, in which she writes, draws, paints, and collages.

Ingrid Ellison, The Grace of Summer, oil on panel, 12” x 12”, 2018

Frequently she experiences a period in which she feels as though she has explored all her options in a particular body of work and were she to continue, she would begin repeating herself. This is usually followed by a series of unsuccessful paintings that she keeps making until something new reveals itself, and then she is off following that tangent. It’s a very experimental phase, she says, and one of her tricks to moving through it is to force herself to start differently.

 

Kim Bernard

Kim Bernard has been working with a quarter round shape that forms a particular mark. It took her weeks of focusing exclusively on this flow-like element to get the mark right. This was followed by several more weeks of figuring out what materials to work with and how to apply the mark. She says this period was characterized by quite a bit of dissatisfaction, but she dealt with it, because “the older I get, the less I am willing to accept something that’s not just right in my work.”

 

Movement has been a consistent theme in Bernard’s oeuvre, which ranges from kinetic sculpture and gestural painting, to painting with a pendulum, sculpture racing contraptions, spring shoes, and finger painting.

Recently, Bernard experienced a bout of creative block. She had finished her Amphibious Tiny House project, which consumed her for 2017. She felt a bit lost and spent the next few months fighting going to her studio because it was painful to be in there. To ease back in, she gave herself permission to do whatever she wanted, as long as she was in the studio. She messed around with paints, drew, took photographs. Most of the work she produced was not good, but she persevered , telling herself that nothing was guaranteed to happen if she didn’t try. And eventually something sparked.

Kim Bernard, Go With The Flow, 16” x 24”, encaustic on panel framed with lead

During this period, Bernard read books about the creative process and listened to podcasts on creativity, all the while observing herself and taking notes. She developed a workshop called “Cultivating Creativity,” in which she guides students through playful exercises that inspire, build creative confidence, and generate ideas, leaving them with an arsenal of go-to strategies they can revisit for inspiration.

 

Bernard just turned 53 and she feels a sense of time passing. She has become increasingly selective about the kind of work she does and where she exhibits. “I don’t want to waste time and energy spinning my wheels on what’s not meaningful.”

 

Gail Spaien

Throughout her career, Gail Spaien has explored the question of how to bring the natural world into a static gallery setting. Her paintings translate the sensations around her with concentrated detail, depicting an idealized view of nature and a denial of unpleasant things. She paints the world as she would like it to be and invites the viewer to experience a painting as an object that holds an opportunity for contemplation, physical intimacy and affective power.

Gail Spaien, Serenade #10, acrylic on linen, 41” x 44”, 2017

A painter of ‘weather and seasons,’ Spaien feeds her studio practice by working in her garden. She says that she has come to appreciate the symmetry of landscape design through hours spent composing an image and arranging her garden to create a form of balance that is both stable and active.

Gail Spaien, Serenade #6, acrylic on linen, 34” x 36”, 2017

And Spaien admits that she is lost a lot. Her strategy, like that of Wolyniec, Ellison, and Bernard, is simply to keep working. That is followed by taking walks in all kinds of weather, as well as looking at art in person and in books.

 

At this time in her career, Spaien refuses to worry about whether she is doing it right anymore. This has, at times in the past, hindered her ability to have a particular kind of freedom in the studio. When stuck, she returns to pragmatic, technically-based core questions. Throughout all of her work is the thread of her core inquiry. How, she wonders, can she give form to life’s paradox and poignancy?

Gail Spaien, Renegade Mirage #2, acrylic on linen, 38” x 40”, 2018

UMVA Member Showcase: Michelle Leier, Sandy Olson, Amy Pollien, Ruth Sylmor

Michelle Leier

My paintings explore visual stimuli either from direct observation or from photographs and drawings made of scenes from my daily life. Lately I have been working on a series of still lifes which are contemplations of a group of objects I have in my studio. I had only planned to make one painting of these objects. However, I have discovered different views of it are intriguing to me for various reasons, so I am making several paintings from alternative views and perspectives. In the way a jazz musician can take a series of chords from a song and make an infinite variety of improvisations from it, I am finding that this still life affords me multiple opportunities for variation on a single theme. The more I come to understand the forms and patterns of light and shape in the set-up, the better I am able to improvise and play with making original compositions. By understanding the fundamentals of the visual stimuli, I can freely express myself by abstracting the most important elements, exaggerating some aspects, minimizing others, and changing still more .

Michelle Leier, “Green Still Life”, oil on panel, 12 x 9 inches, 2018, Jay York
Michelle Leier, “Blue Still Life”, oil on panel, 9 x 12 inches, 2017, Jay York

Sandy Olson

I have been working on The Resilience Project for about eight years. The latest installment is called simply The Map. It is scripted to document, in images and words, my thirty plus years living in rural Central Maine.

My studio practice had been erratic for years and I was unable to make this story meld cohesively. About a year ago I invited some of my favorite archetypes to join me in my working space and they definitely livened up the place.

At first the critters on sticks were so endearing that I became obsessed with making them, thinking maybe they were to become the centerpieces to the story I wanted to tell.  Eventually they settled into the background as I returned to my favorite complexity of line drawings, photo grids and words. My studio now has the layered look of a palimpsest landscape where I am comfortable creating.

Sandy Olson “Critters And Places” photograph
Sandy Olson “Icons in Cutouts and Lines” photograph
Sandy Olson “Ma Famille” photograph
Sandy Olson “Mapping Time And Place” photograph

Amy Pollien

My work has always revolved around still life compositions. In an effort to (literally) expand my horizons I’ve experimented over the past few years with painting plants where they grow, in the context of the garden landscape. This practice expanded the visual field and added a level of complexity that was difficult to achieve with arrangements and props in the studio. On a quest for the perfect still life painting, however, I was still not completely satisfied with the result.

Last Thanksgiving I went to London and spent most of my time in the National Gallery. I had the opportunity to study hundreds of still life paintings “in the flesh” and found myself fascinated by Dutch and Flemish work from the 14th to 16th centuries. The overflowing vases and anonymous backgrounds had never appealed to me in printed images , but the effect of standing in front of the collection was electric. The depth of field in a still life composition is generally quite shallow but the masters of this period managed to represent the universe in a spray of blossoms on a tabletop.

Since the trip I’ve been working toward understanding the Dutch Baroque period constructs and learning how to apply those ideas to the heaps of roses and pumpkins and apple blossoms that will soon be at hand from the garden. Maybe there will be a hermit crab with a basket of blossoms inspired by Balthasar van der Ast, or a bowl of colorful berries and pet birds from van Hulsdonck and George Flegel. I feel like there are decades of inspiration down this road and can’t wait to set up the paintings and get to work.

Pollien finds inspiration in this painting by Balthasar van der Ast
The Italian Vase, 2018, 24 x 18, oil on panel A large vase of coreopsis, cosmos, and zinnias in a traditional still life composition, work in progress
Honeysuckle and Matronalis, 2016, 36 x 24, oil on panel Composition in the garden, image courtesy of anonymous collector
Garden Studio Painting a set-up of fruit and vegetables with drapery

Ruth Sylmor

    “Photography is a way of shouting, of freeing oneself, not of proving or asserting one’s own originality. It is a way of life.”
                                                                           Henri Cartier-Bresson

Living in Paris during the long, cold, grey, windy winter of 2018, my photographs capture moments of  LA CRUE  when la Seine overflowed its banks by 5.84 meters.

My life, my daily photographic life, consists of meandering with my camera – seeing, composing, focusing, pressing the shutter, winding, rewinding, reloading, and knowing, as Cartier-Bresson also said, that “of course it’s all luck!”

Ruth Sylmor “Crue de la Seine 2018. Pont des Arts” silver print 14 x 11 inches
Ruth Sylmor “Crue de la Seine 2018. Ile de la Cite Bernard” silver print 14 x 11 inches
Ruth Sylmor “Crue de la Seine 2018. Quai St” silver print 14 x 11 inches
Ruth Sylmor “Crue de la Seine 2018. Ile de la Cite Bernard” silver print 14 x 11 inches

Insight / Incite

The community of Bowdoinham recently built a beautiful, small skateboard park dedicated in memory of Matthew Townsend Parker, who died of viral encephalitis and viral meningitis at the age of 15 in 2004.  Since Matthew’s death, efforts to build the park finally came to fruition in 2017.  The park is on the Cathance River waterfront in the center of town.  Bricks inscribed with donor names comprise the walkway leading into the park, which is surrounded by a wooden fence.

The Merrymeeting Art Center (MAC) in Bowdoinham prioritized the participation of students in creating a mural. They obtained funding for a mural on the inside wall of the park via a grant from the Maine Arts Commission.  Three artists were chosen for the project: Jane Page-Conway, mixed media artist, Manon Whittlesay, printmaker, and Karen Goetting, art teacher at the Bowdoinham Community School (BCS).

 

The fence wall is large, rough and obstructed by support structures on its inner side.  This complicated the project’s design. The artists decided that the mural would be made by painting skateboard decks (without the wheels) and then placing them on the fence.  They had a local wood worker; Paul Baines, cut the skateboard decks from primed wood.

They had many sessions with the students from Kindergarten thru fifth grade during Karen’s art classes, over a period of 4 weeks. Discussions occurred regarding the physicality and energy of a skateboarder and how one might visually portray this with lines, shapes, color and texture on the boards.  Students were limited to two primary colors and no use of symbols or words.

Demonstrations were given on how to use thick paste paints to create pattern and texture with sponge brushes and tools to drag through the paints with cut up plastic lids, pencil erasers, combs and fingers. There were several sessions of cutting stamps for printmaking.  The stamps were used following the painting sessions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The boards are spectacular and will be installed on the fence in the springtime. One boy exclaimed  “I can’t wait to see all of the cool skateboards on the fence for the public people to see. I will be able to see all of the boards that were made in my class. I think that the skateboarders will really like looking at this art while they are skating.”

The children of BCS are proud of their artwork and are eager to see what the installation will soon look like.

 

 

Betsy Sholl – Poetry by Craig Sipe, “Reunion in Beaver Falls”

Craig Sipe, a Mainer now, grew up, as his poem says, in Pennsylvania.  But the changing world his speaker describes with poignancy could be any of the mill towns here in Maine as they face decline and try to rebuild themselves.   The poem also looks at how our relationship to our original home can both change and remain the same.

 

 

Reunion in Beaver Falls  (by Craig Sipe)

I am from Beaver Falls Pa,
part of Beaver County,
County Seat in the town of Beaver.

And I can tell you straight-on
that in 27 years I never
saw one damned beaver
…the whole time…

But I did see the night lit up
by blast furnaces all along
the Ohio River Boulevard
on the way to Pittsburgh,

I saw my father bent
by 21 turn shifts in a Cold Draw
pulling pipe, I saw
a thick, gray river
run past the Devout College

On the hill where the mill
fires paid for my brains but burned
my soul in cigarette plumes
over a smoker’s porch

Where the agnostics hung out
over the Beaver River, where
I gave birth to wanting to leave.

I am from Beaver Falls
where the years snuffed out the mills,
laid off a generation,
and seeded the diaspora of the next,

Where every house on every street
was for sale, wishing to dig itself up,
to redeem its soul from mortgage
and the need to change.

Beaver Falls, Beaver County,
County Seat of Beaver,
where a clean blue river

Flows today by a gas station economy,
and the   one each        legacy
donut and pizza shop   still there,

River flowing, falling by me,
stranger on the green bank,
a ghost of quit habits

staring up at the cross on the hill
one bank above the Devout College,
quite the going concern here now,

Hoping for a sign…some portent,
for a blast, for a smoke, for one God
Damned   bully   beaver.

–Craig Sipe

UMVA Members’ Showcase— Clara Cohan, Maggie Muth, Lesia Sochor

Clara Cohan

I have spent most of my time in this physical body contemplating existence. As a child, I would travel out into the night sky to see just how far I could go. Spoiler…I have yet to find an end point.

As a young adult, I spent many years living in a quiet cabin. The land and streams provided a good portion of my food. Trees that were thinned from the surrounding woods gave me warmth and cooking fuel. Water was gravity-fed into my home from an ever-flowing spring. Most of my contemplations during this time were about living in harmony with the ever-changing seasons. I understood my connection and the presence of oneness.

In my middle years, I moved to the dry bones of the American Southwest. The landscape opened my Soul to a deeper night sky. Ancestors roamed the canyons and mesas. Time was arranged in layers and spirals rather than linear.

Once, on a peyote journey, I saw my physical beginnings. Egg and sperm, dividing and multiplying, molecules forming…all of the complexities of my human self…an ultimate creative act.

My father lived to be ninety years old. His mind and hearing had pretty much left him. When I received the call that he was nearing his passing, I drove the 12 hours from my home to his. Arriving at 7:30 pm to the hospital, he was in bed and mumbling in an incoherent manner. I stood quietly watching him. At one moment he opened his eyes and clearly said, “Oh, you are here!”  We proceeded to have an unusual lucid conversation which was sustained for 45 minutes. He then fell into a deep sleep. The next day, as I was looking into his eyes and he was looking into mine, he took his last breath. In that moment I saw the entire Universe open.

When my mother died, I sat with her body for a lifetime. She was truly done with her physical body after ninety three and a half years. We buried her the next day.  Later in the day, in a sacred grove, I meditated. It was there that I clearly felt my mother’s presence. She gestured with her hand in a high arc from left to right, and I heard her, in a voiceless way, say, “It’s so much more”.

My DNA results confirm both my paternal and maternal lineage, Eastern European Jew and Italian, respectively.

It is all of the above that defines my Origins, from physical to infinite.  This is what is expressed in all my creations.

“Origins”, Figure:Basswood, oil stain, oil paint, Plaque: Walnut, teak oil, 30.5 x 11 x 11 inches, Photo credit: Courtesy of the artist
“Origins” (Detail of plaque), Walnut, teak oil, 6 x 4.5 x .75 inches, Photo credit: Courtesy of the artist
“Contemplating Our Place in the Universe”, basswood, oil stain, wax finish, 36 x 4.5 x .4.5 inches, Photo credit: Courtesy of the artist
“Energy from the Center”, basswood, oil stain, wax finish, 21 x 4 x .4 inches, Photo credit: Courtesy of the artist

Maggie Muth

Some would say my origin is that of a female middle child born into a traditional large Irish-Catholic family. Like all of us however, I am many things, but I continue to have fun mining the deep chaotic well of my childhood.  My work speaks of traditional female domestic work, large family dinner table banter, growing up in the 60’s. I embroider because, although I wanted to paint, painting was taboo in my family. It was the age of Picasso. We were not going to be encouraged to emulate a philandering foreigner who painted disjointed nudes. Although I paint now, embroidery was my first love and my entry into the world of art. It is still a favorite of mine. I like to embroider anecdotes and funny thoughts I experienced growing up. My original intention was to pass on to my children what I was like as a kid. It only became artwork as the project grew. In hindsight, it reflects how different life was in urban white America fifty years ago, than it is now. I like the contrast.

“Canned Food Was Delicious”, hand embroidery on silk noile, 8.5 x 11 inches, 2017 Photo credit: Jay York
“I Didn’t Like Going To Church”, hand embroidery on silk noile, 8.5 x 11 inches, 2007 Photo credit: Riel Sturchio
“Glad I Am Vegetarian Now”, hand embroidery on silk noile, 8.5 x 11 inches, 2017 Photo credit: Jay York
“My Love of Ice Cream Started Early”, hand embroidery on silk noile, 8.5 x 11 inches, 2006 Photo credit: Riel Sturchio

 

Lesia Sochor

For me, the annual spring ritual of making ‘Pysanky’, the ancient art form of Ukrainian decorated eggs, is an acknowledgment and celebration of my cultural heritage. The tradition I grew up with, passed down to me by my mother, I now carry on with my family.

It was a natural evolution to depict this iconic symbol in my paintings. So full of meaning and lore, I found endless inspiration in its rich narrative and 5,000 year old history. It was a way of honoring and connecting me to my roots.

“Ritual”, oil, 49 x 55 inches
“Fertility”, oil on canvas, 41 x 32 inches
“Making Honey”, oil, 28 x 20 inches

 

 

William Irvine on Regionalism

“Hauling In the Fog” oil on canvas, 32 X 36 inches

Maine has its own character, soul if you wish. I felt it the first morning I woke
up in Maine, in an A-frame on Tom Leighton Point in Washington County, lobster
boats droning off shore, gulls crying, the smell of herring bait. A smudge of islands on the horizon. I had arrived from Scotland, and our two souls bonded. It was love at first sight.

As my work developed, it seemed to be formed by those two places: the
white fishermen’s houses of Jonesport and the whitewashed farms of Scotland; the presence of the Atlantic, sometimes moody and turbulent and other times fresh and clean as linen sheets.

“Girl With A Boat”, oil on board, 12X16 inches

So I worked with those visual stimulants, but the depiction of landscape is
never the end intention. For the creative artist it is the vehicle through which he
expresses something more universal, the landscape of the mind, where we all live no matter our physical location.

John Marin’s seascapes are not just about Maine scenery; “The Written Sea”
comes to mind, a favorite of mine. Marsden Hartley’s paintings of Mount Katahdin
are presences that go beyond Maine—they have the grandeur of a Tahitian god or a Greek hero, like Heracles.

So does it matter where we live? I think it does, for each artist finds his
comfort zone, a place he feels connected to. Van Gogh in Provence, Marin in
Addison, de Kooning on Long Island. It is a place that allows us to communicate
with our surroundings. We use the props at hand, be they hills or harbors; in my
case, clouds, islands, and boats. But are they any different from cypress trees, vineyards, and wheat fields? The trail of a lobster boat echoing the horizon is just,
for me, a necessary line in the composition, which strengthens the final expression.

“Heading Out 2” oil on board, 25×35 inches

Artists talk to their surroundings, but not in any local language; after all,
artists are forever from away.

Visual Essay: Vivien Russe

Vivien Russe

Vivien Russe, “Copernicus and the Beggar”, 2002, acrylic on panel. 10in. x 30in. photo: Jay York

 

The word Ubuntu, meaning “I am myself because of who we all are”, is a call and a reminder that we, as individuals, are connected to all people, especially in an increasingly globalized world.

 

 

Vivien Russe, “The Illuminator” , 2002, acrylic on panel, 32 in. x.36 in. photo: Jay York
Vivien Russe, “Homage to Higgs”, 2013, acrylic on panel, diptych, 10 in. x 20 in. photo: Jay York

 

What has been a core issue in my own work broadens this concept to “I am myself because we live on Earth” and the responsibility this brings. While we each carry on with our day to day lives, the knowledge that gives us is a much larger context in which  to place ourselves. Information about the smallest of particles to the nature of the universe is now available to most people with the click of a button. The more we know, the heavier the responsibility can weigh.

 

Vivien Russe, “Owl”, 2011, acrylic on panel, 16 in. x 15 in. photo Jay York
Vivien Russe, “Cranes”, 2011, acrylic on panel, 15in. x 16 in. photo: Jay York

 

The paintings I’ve chosen here, done since 2002, seek to examine our place in the world, what we depend on for life as we know it, and potential threats to this. While there are no human figures in my work, it is all about being human. While the work is representational, it is abstract in concept. The paintings are asking the viewer to think about these considerations. For example, in the painting Origin, I contemplate the nature of fire: what is its relationship to light and color, its use as a metaphor, and more significantly, its role in the maintenance of life on a micro and macro level?

 

Vivien Russe, Rinsed, 2005, acrylic on panel, 16in. x 15 in. photo: Jay York
Vivien Russe, “Offering”, 2007, acrylic on panel, diptych, 10 in. x 24 in. photo: Jay York

 

In the end, I’m shouting out to the world, “Please don’t take this all for granted, it is precious and fragile.”

 

Vivien Russe, “White Dome in Rain”, 2005, acrylic on panel, diptych, 10 in x 24 in. photo: Jay York

Spring 2017: Member Submissions, Light in the Dark: Art As a Sane Voice in an Insane World

Sharyn Paul Brusie  “Facing The Light of Day”  2015  Acrylic  36″ X 36″
Sharyn Paul Brusie  “In this Together”  2015  Acrylic  36″ X 36″
Photo by Luc Demers
Lin Lisberger, “BLT” (2016) 6”H x 12”Diameter, Cherry, peach, poplar, pine, copper (Image credit: Luc Demers)

Lin Lisberger, Sandwich Picnic, (2015) 8”H x 28” x 26 1/2”, Various woods (Photo credit: Luc Demers)
“In times of darkness humor carries me forward. These Sandwiches were all made before this particular troubling time, but all reflect the need to face adversity and lunacy with laughter and art.” – Lin Lisberger

Ed McCartan

The light in these dark times often needs to come from  within as well as from the community.  Seeing beauty in natural forms helps us respond as creative people.  Out of the deep forest, the entangled garden and the storm light and strength can come.  Going to nature is my response to assert the interconnectedness of all beings.

Ed McCartan, “Dark Landscape” acrylic on canvas 40×40 inches
Ed McCartan, “Stormy Weather” acrylic on mirrored paper on canvas 10×10 inches
Kenny Cole, “Entry (After Ensor)”2017, Collage, ink, gouache on paper 22 x 30 inches
Kenny Cole, “The Great Battle (Nuclear Button)” 2017 Collage, ink, gouache on paper 15 x 11 inches

 

Ruth Sylmor

During this time when the world seems askew and inside-out, I turn to poetry.

The Peace of Wild Things
By Wendell Berry

When despair for the world grows in me
and I wake in the night at the least sound
in fear of what my life and my children’s lives may be,
I go and lie down where the wood drake
rests in his beauty on the water, and the great heron feeds.
I come into the peace of wild things
who do not tax their lives with forethought
of grief. I come into the presence of still water.
And I feel above me the day-blind stars
waiting with their light. For a time
I rest in the grace of the world, and am free.

 

Ruth Sylmor, “Luynes, France” (2014) silver print 10 x 8 inches
Ruth Sylmor, “Venice, Italy” (2008) silver print 8 x 10 inches

Nikki Millonzi

I created Rainbow Warrior 31 years ago in response to the removal of native families in the Four Corners area of the southwest from their tribal native lands around Big Mountain. They were relocated so The Peabody Coal Company could strip mine coal. The elders were not happy.

Still today, the energy wars continue as fossil fuel companies plunder sacred native lands and threaten our planet. The elders standing, dancing and praying peacefully on the frigid grounds of Standing Rock shine light into the dark drive of these energy companies. In the drive for profits, the Dakota Access Pipeline aims to move dirty oil at the price of harming our water supplies, disregarding native lands and the rights of tribal treaties and agreements and destroying our planet.

May many Rainbow Warriors fight on!

Nikki Millonzi, “Rainbow Warrior” (1986) Mixed media 29 x 31 inches

June Kellogg

Walking in nature has been the place where I’ve found light in the current atmosphere of political darkness. It is the place where I’m able to breathe and let all the daily political news dissipate from my mind. I’ve recently used my painting to express my belief that nature is not here to be dominated. It is not a commodity to be used to increase our standard of living or to increase our amount of consumption.

There are so many problems right now with water and food production that it is imperative that we begin to think globally about what is happening to the world’s resources. We must recognize and honor our interdependence with nature and realize that we are all connected by it. We must consume less, pollute less, share more, recycle more, protect nature, and create a more sustainable earth.

June Kellogg, “Sustainability For Land and Sea” acrylic & ceramic stucco on canvas 30 x 28
June Kellogg, “Stay Close To Nature” (2017) Acrylic & Ceramic Stucco on Canvas 30 x 28 inches
Daniel Lovely, “The Nightmare”

Heidi Daub

Selected and edited definitions of “light” from Random House Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary 2nd edition.

luminous energy, electromagnetic radiation to which the organs of sight react
kindle; ignite
to come into existence or being
the aspect in which a thing appears or is regarded
something that affords illumination
to brighten with animation or joy
to clarify
the state of being visible
a gleam or sparkle in the eyes
spiritual awareness; enlightenment
to accept or understand
to be discovered or revealed, to begin

Heidi Daub, “Tracks#3” (2016) Acrylic on paper 11 x 12 inches

Heidi Daub, “Budding” (2016) Acrylic on canvas, 24 x 28 inches

John Ripton, “La Lucha Continua” 2007

John Ripton, “Proud & Dangerous & Powerful” (2017) Photography 12 x 16 inches

 

 

Nick Pagliughi, “Out of Sight Out of Our Mind”
Nick Pagliughi, “I Try Not To Read the News”

 

 

Karen Merritt, “Perfect Offering Year: 2013”, Gelatin Silver Print Dimensions 16 x 16
Karen Merritt “Street Buddha” (2014) Gelatin Silver Print 16 x 16 inches

 

 

Paula Dougherty

The theme of enlightenment is dear to my heart. In art, I attempt to depict the highest level of love and wisdom “i” can conceive of.   Routinely,  little buddha-like images pop out on small papers; I search for the higher-self in life drawings and portraits; paint plant paintings enthusiastically in the garden; and explore outer/inner space tirelessly in meditation and the abstract realm.

Artwork Included: a recent pastel portrait of a baby doctor-to-be drawn from life; a response to two teenage self-immolations – in Tibet and India – protests on the same day against Chinese rule in Tibet – 3/2016; two light tributes to the Buddha, dharma and sangha.
Inspiring Quote from Leonardo da Vinci:
“You must grow in patience when you meet with great wrongs, and they will then be powerless to vex your mind.”
Paula Dougherty, “Prostration” (2016)Watercolor and Ink, 5  3/4″ × 6″
Photo by Artist
Paula Dougherty, “The Teaching” (2016) Ink, 2 3/4 x 5 1/4 inches
Photo by Artist

 

 

Anita Clearfield

My paintings are an expression of the ironic space between the mundane that i can influence and the BIG PICTURE stuff that remains beyond my reach. Especially in these times, when we’re confronted by powerlessness, dissolving truths, and even the end of our planet, how does one carry on — whether it’s picking-up a toothbrush or a paintbrush? My “Before the Flood” series uses figurative abstraction to embody this disconnect between singular actions and nothingness.

Anita Clearfield “Before the Flood: Last Fried Egg” (2017) Oil on linen 18 x 24 inches
Anita Clearfield “Before the Flood: Last Guy to Get His Pants On” (2017) Oil and ink on canvas 16 x 20 inches

 

Michael Branca

“Paint? Paint!”

Michael Branca “A Whole New Red, White and Blue” Oil on three canvases November 2016 Each canvas 8” x10”
Michael Branca “Seeing Red” Oil on canvas November 2016 20” x 16”

 

 

Marcus Parsons

These works explore aspects of cooperation. They explore issues that commonly arise within ourselves and with each other.

Two implicit questions:
1. Self and other—what might we make of them?
2. What is involved in cooperating toward ends that we all seek? Among those ends: peace, harmony, compassion toward each other (in spirit and in deed), shared prosperity, mutual tolerance and respect, equality (i.e., of access to opportunity, power, privilege, liberty, etc.).

Marcus Parsons, “Self/Other Box” (2016) digital, 25 1/2 x 20 3/8 inches

 

 

Anne Scheer

“The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.”  Emma Lazarus

Anne Scheer, “Wretched Refuse”, (2016) Acrylic monotype with digital transfer, on recycled cotton paper, 22 x 29 inches
Anne Scheer, “Homeless tempest-tost”, (2015) Oil on gessoed paper, 22 x 29 inches

 

Lisa Mossel Vietze

I picked up a camera in 1998 with the intention of making landscape images full of drama with grand, far-off vistas in which I could hope to escape from childhood misery.

But what my images came to reveal is the power and intimacy of smaller landscapes, like that of a flower. I was increasingly drawn to the subtleties of petal, leaf and stem; I stopped chasing the horizon and began to search my own backyard.

A flower is the plant’s highest expression of self, as well as a promise of a new generation, giving of its energy for creating seeds. I’m often in awe of the color or design when I’m making a flower image. In this process, I continue to heal.

Flowers … become like messengers from another realm, like a bridge between the world of the physical form and the formless.

[ some words from Eckhart Tolle’s book A New Earth.]

Lisa Mossel Vietze, “Cathedral” (2015)
Lisa Mossel Vietze, “Free Bird” (2013)